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Episcopal Church Still Counting Breakaway Diocese in Membership Numbers

Christian Post - Church & Ministry - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 9:20am
When The Episcopal Church recently released its statistics on membership among its dioceses for 2013, the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina was listed along with the others. There is one problem, however: the South Carolina Diocese's leadership voted to leave the denomination back in 2012, taking most of the members and congregations with them.
Categories: Christian Post

A Word for the Lonely

Christian Post - Living - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 9:09am
Maybe you've been abandoned—perhaps it was by your parents, your spouse, or your children. Or maybe you even feel that you've been abandoned by God Himself. There are many people who feel estranged and alienated from God. Even if they have everything they want in life, they may still face a deep, inner loneliness.
Categories: Christian Post

Heartbreak: Ebola, orphans, family

Mission Network News - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 5:00am

(Photo courtesy Reach Global)

Liberia (MNN) -- The cost of Liberia's Ebola crisis goes beyond the health emergency. Peggy Maynard, Global Fingerprints Liberia Coordinator, says, "Because the borders are closed, the markets are closed. Food is becoming scarce and very expensive, so it's hard for people to even get enough food to eat. Also, many of the health clinics are closed because people are afraid of Ebola patients coming in. "We are really focusing on providing our children and our staff with food and healthcare--that's our first priority," Maynard explains. They've made a commitment to the children, plus, keeping the staff healthy means they can focus on priority #2, which she says is "reaching out to the newly-created Ebola orphans." A recent UNICEF assessment indicates Ebola orphans could double before the end of the month. Recent government data suggests that the average Liberian household had three children, and you can see the dilemma. Maynard clarifies, "The immediate problem is that people are afraid to even go near these children because of Ebola. Then of course, the long-term problem is finding housing and care for these children in a country that has been ravaged by civil war, and now ravaged by this disease." Kids are emerging as the most vulnerable group in the Ebola crisis in three ways: they're at risk of contracting the disease, being orphaned by it, or losing their options for a future/education. Maynard says that's why they set up the Ebola Crisis Response Fund. "We partner with the Evangelical Free Church of West Africa, which is based in Monrovia, but they reach out across Liberia and even into the neighboring countries. They have seized this opportunity to reach out into new communities with information about Ebola, with sanitation supplies and with hope." Why the Church? Maynard muses, "Crisis brings out the needs in people. People, I think, are more responsive to the Gospel in a time when they are in fear for their lives." Because of the compassion that comes with the Great Commission, Christians are eager to share their hope in Christ. "They see this as an opportunity to actually plant churches. They are looking at this as an opportunity for ministry rather than a tragedy."

(Photo courtesy Reach Global)

How do they do this? "We are reaching out to people's needs--their physical needs, but at the same time, we are reaching out to them with the Gospel and trying to meet their eternal needs. We feel that we can do both. It doesn't have to be one or the other." In this time of crisis, sponsorship makes a huge difference. It provides for a child’s daily meals, medical attention, and an education. "We are in the process now of finding those orphans [and] entering them into our Global Fingerprints system so that people can sponsor them for $35 a month." This is the message a sponsorship sends: "You are cared for, and you belong.” Maynard says it could be the most important response the Church takes in this crisis. "This is our long-term solution to the problem: to get those children into homes and make sure that their needs are met, and at the same time making sure that they hear the Gospel and that they're getting into a local church." Pray for wisdom: Global Fingerprints Liberian staff members are dealing directly with Ebola families. "We're just praying for an end to Ebola. God can work miracles. He can do anything. He was not surprised by this. We were surprised by it, but He wasn't surprised by it." Donations to the EFCA Ebola Crisis Response fund and child sponsorships in Liberia provide both the short-term and the long-term response to the emergency.
Categories: Mission Network News

World Student Day 2014

Mission Network News - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 5:00am

(Logo credit IFES)

International (MNN) -- Today is World Student Day. If you're not sure exactly what that means, keep reading. "It's a great opportunity to pray for future world leaders and church shapers," explains Andy Moore of the International Fellowship of Evangelical Students (IFES), a ministry partner of InterVarsity Christian Fellowship. "Many [university] students go on to hold positions of influence in politics and business and church, and the wider society." Not only does the Body of Christ pray for its next generation on World Student Day, but Christian college students worldwide pray for one another. Over 3,500 students have signed up to pray via e-mail and Facebook. "It's a great opportunity for students and staff to hear from one another about the various challenges that face them in their contexts," Moore adds.

(Photo credit IFES)

"This year, we have a multilingual chat site, so people can come along and speak in either English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Russian, or Chinese, and the chat room will automatically translate whatever they type into the other languages. [It's] a bit like the early chapters of Acts, where all of the hearers could hear the disciples speaking in their own language." Technology plays a key role in minimizing language barriers, getting students to engage in conversation, and facilitating prayer. "In the past, we've had Google Hangouts that connect people in different countries with one another to pray for one another," says Moore. "We try to facilitate some things; but equally, it's great to see the creativity of students as they think about how they can connect with their [Christian] brothers and sisters in different parts of the world." Meeting fellow collegiate believers and commiserating about the struggles and challenges that come with bearing the name of Christ on campus builds a special bond among Next Generation believers.

(Photo credit IFES)

"I think [students'] faith is enriched as they engage with students from other cultures, particularly as we get to pray together. There's a unique unity that's expressed in prayer," Moore shares. Learn more about World Student Day and find prayer needs here. "We can keep people in contact with the prayers that have been prayed and the answers to prayer."
Categories: Mission Network News

A different face of Brazil

Mission Network News - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 5:00am
Brazil (MNN) -- Brazil is considered to be a developing country. Yet, in the last few decades, Southeast Brazil has prospered. This wealthy side of Brazil is what the rest of the world knows. So why is it a developing country? Northeast Brazil is very poor. In some ways, it's a different country altogether. We spoke with Jose Carrasco, the director of South America for Compassion International. "The Northeast of Brazil is definitely not like the Southeast," Carrasco says. "The problem with Brazil is disparity, and also the amount of people that are not part of the success of the economy Brazil has had in the last decades." Far from the big cities, extremely poor communities exist, similar to the poorest places of Africa and Asia. "The poverty is really, really amazing," Carrasco says. "The people don't have running water, they have disease, they have infant mortality that is really, really high. And if you compare that with a city like Sao Paulo in the southeast of Brazil, it's like night and day." This area of Brazil presents no opportunities--educational, economical or otherwise--to its residents. According to Compassion, northeast Brazil has a higher concentration of murders than New York City, Detroit, and Chicago combined. "Poverty brings a lot of bad behaviors," Carrasco says, explaining that years of oppression have stunted opportunity. The people of this region have very little hope for a better future and a very little sense of worth. Their living conditions have received little attention, and there has been little help. Carrasco says, "Very few people in the southeast of Brazil--which is the Brazil that most of the world knows--understand this and know about this." These people live in spiritual darkness, as well. One city in which Compassion is working, Codó, is the center of the African black magic religion, Macumba. Carrasco says it is very similar to voodoo in Haiti. "Black magic happens all over that area, and it's very, very strong. We have brought the Gospel there, and to our amazement (I imagine God had it all planned that way), we have been able to present the Gospel openly. "It hasn't been resisted...from the different communities. They've been open to the Gospel. We have opened many projects throughout, and we're focusing on bringing the Gospel to them through our projects." These projects--child development centers--are made possible through partnerships with the local churches. The passion for these people is strong from both Compassion and the churches. Because the churches are small, however, they do not have means to implement the same programs that Compassion has in other areas. Despite this, the childhood development centers address the spiritual, physical, and emotional needs of the children. Parents send their children here because of the opportunities, not caring that the Gospel will be shared. Often times, the children bring back the Gospel to their homes and share it with their families. Compassion wants to spread the news about this part of Brazil so that they can offer the communities more opportunities for a better life. Soon they want to start providing programs for children 3-5 years old. Carrasco says he recently presented the needs of northeast Brazil to churches in the United States and the UK. This advocacy is key to expanding the ministry in northeast Brazil. "We have done all this and, obviously, I will say that you should do the same--presenting this to more audiences so they will understand the needs of Brazil." Make Brazil your priority along with Compassion. Click here to find more information and learn how you can help through prayer, giving, and advocacy. Pray that the Gospel will take root and transform individuals, families, and entire communities.
Categories: Mission Network News

SAT-7 gives hope to Middle Easterners

Mission Network News - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 5:00am

(Photo courtesy of SAT-7)

Iraq (MNN) -- “They’re not going to school. They’ve been uprooted from their homes. They don’t know maybe where their parents are. They don’t have any sense if they’re even alive.” Speaking of children, Dr. Rex Rogers, President of SAT-7 USA, a Christian satellite television ministry to the Middle East and North Africa, says they are the ones most affected by ISIS attacks. More than ever, children--and their parents--need a message of peace. This message is being aired on SAT-7 24 hours a day, on 6 different channels, in three different languages: Arabic, Farsi, and Turkish. SAT-7 programming is produced by Middle Easterners, for Middle Easterners. Rogers says, “We broadcast who we are. We share Christ and Christianity. We talk about human rights, like liberty and respect for property, respect for religious worship for all people. And we try to reinforce values of peace or dealing with conflict in a different way other than violence. In the Middle East, watching television is a family event. “All of our channels use every kind of television program or genre that you can think of that are legitimate--game shows or drama or movies.” SAT-7 KIDS programs creatively touch the hearts of children through sing-a-longs, puppet shows, and bedtime stories. Children and their families learn the truth of Christ as presented in the simplicity and animation of children’s programs. SAT-7 is completely funded through donations. If you would like to help, click here. Pray that SAT-7 will continue helping families and providing hope across the Middle East.
Categories: Mission Network News

Central India church restored

Mission Network News - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 5:00am
India (MNN) -- The fire stole their church altar, a Bible, chairs, rugs, and several other items, but they didn’t lose faith. On September 26, 2014, a church in Madhya Pradesh, India was burned. Police are still searching for the person or persons who started the fire. Gospel for Asia Pastor R. says that in his ten years of serving in the area, this was the first act of vandalism he has seen. Two days after the fire occurred, believers and Pastor R., gathered outside the charred church for their Sunday service. Despite the incident, they remained hopeful and encouraged about what God is doing in their lives. Locals have stood by believers and Pastor R. offering support. Villagers have been working hard to repair the church. They have cleaned, repainted, and restored the church altar. A GFA field correspondent says, “The work of the church is so good for the villagers, and they have positive views about the church. They even said good things about our church to the police officials.” During the restoration, authorities guarded the church and purchased the needed resources for it. On October 9, 2014, the church reopened its doors with around 300 believers ready to worship and rededicate it. Pray that villagers will remain strong in their faith and stay encouraged despite the fire.
Categories: Mission Network News

State money helps repair Lycoming County homes

WGRC News - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 1:25pm

The Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency awarded Lycoming County more than $2 million to help pay for housing programs and projects. The money comes from impact fees paid by natural gas companies. It will be used to help build more affordable housing and to improve existing homes and neighborhoods.
County officials say money is used based on need. Part of the money will go toward housing development projects for the elderly, and low income families.

Categories: Local News

Penn State student suffers burns from explosion in class

WGRC News - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 1:24pm

An explosion at the Agricultural and Biological Engineering Building on the Penn State campus yesterday sent a student to the hospital with second degree burns. According to the university, a student was doing a tissue culture when the blast occurred in an exhaust hood. An investigation is being conducted by Penn State’s department of environmental health and safety.

Categories: Local News

Penn State student injured from blast

WGRC News - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 1:23pm

An explosion at the Agricultural and Biological Engineering Building on the Penn State campus yesterday sent a student to the hospital with second degree burns. According to the university, a student was doing a tissue culture when the blast occurred in an exhaust hood. An investigation is being conducted by Penn State’s department of environmental health and safety.

Categories: Local News

Mommy, when can we go home?

Mission Network News - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 5:00am
International (FH/MNN) -- The following is a reflection on life for child refugees. Do children have a childhood in a refugee camp? What does the word "home" even mean? Food for the Hungry reports: There is a longing inside each one of us to go home. Whether it is a child away at camp or visiting grandma, or an adult on vacation or away on business, or a young soldier off to serve at a distant post, our hearts long to return to home. While we all feel that tug on our heart strings, most people who read this have a reasonable hope of returning home, either at the end of the day, the end of the trip, or the end of the assignment.

(Photo courtesy of Food for the Hungry)

Worldwide, more than 3 million people are homeless at some time during any given year. The UN High Commission for Refugees reported in June 2014 that the number of people worldwide who will not get to go home at night has exceeded 50 million for the first time since World War II. Over 51.2 million people are refugees, people seeking asylum, or internally displaced persons (IDP). The conflict in Syria alone has created a situation where 9 million people have little hope of going home in the foreseeable future. In just five years, Syria has gone from being the country hosting the second-largest number of refugees to producing the second-largest number of them. Imagine, if you will, millions of children crying in their mothers’ arms at night, “Mommy, when can we go home?” But all those mothers can do is tenderly hold their children and ask the same question silently in their own hearts. Counting refugees only, Syria and Afghanistan have produced 5 million combined, with Iraq adding another 400,000. Keep in mind that the UN report was published prior to the rise of ISIS in Iraq. By now, the refugee count is well over 6 million. So, where have they gone? They have crossed borders into the neighboring Middle East countries, with hundreds of thousands escaping to camps in Iran, Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Yemen, Egypt, and other countries that are, themselves, ill-equipped to shelter, feed, and provide the basis necessities of life for so many. Like the 6.5 million IDPs, the 6 million refugees have escaped one desperate situation only to find themselves in another. We want to believe that people who have become refugees are safe. They are not. They may have escaped the scourge of the fighting, but now they face the test of surviving, often living in tents or other makeshift structures and having no source of providing for themselves. They must place themselves at the mercy of the countries that have taken them in, while millions of children cry, “Mommy, when can we go home?” And still, there is no answer. There is a huge gap between what the host countries can do for the burgeoning numbers of refugees and what those refugees need to survive. That’s why Food for the Hungry (FH) and many other NGOs and faith-based organizations exist. We can fill that void by reaching out in a Christ-like manner, showing compassion, and providing essentials the rest of the world takes for granted. By providing assistance like education for refugee children, we can give them a sense of structure in their lives and prevent the long-term crisis of another generation of uneducated adults. Perhaps, by doing what we do, we can help some of these refugee children feel enough sense of security to feel at home with their parents at night, instead of crying in their arms, asking, “Mommy, when can we go home?” Through their local NGO, FH is actively providing ongoing relief to refugee families in Syria and Lebanon. Would you consider praying for these families and for FH, and helping them to provide for their needs? Read Press Release. Advocate. Give.
Categories: Mission Network News

ISIS in Pakistan?

Mission Network News - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 5:00am

(Photo courtesy Voice of the Martyrs USA/Assyrian International News Agency)

(Pakistan) -- The influence of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) is spreading. It has now reached Pakistan, as evidenced by a move by a half dozen leading figures of the Taliban there. Todd Nettleton, a spokesman for the Voice of the Martyrs USA explains, "They have said that they will come under the authority of the Caliph of the Muslims Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who is the leader of ISIS. So basically they have said, 'We see ISIS as the banner carrier for the Islamic World, for at least the Sunni Islamic world.'" ISIS declared the creation of an Islamic State in June. Their decision could impact Pakistan's borders where the leaders are based, because of their proximity to Afghanistan. "If they join hands with ISIS in Iraq and Syria, if they start working together on taking more territory, if they start working together on terrorist attacks around the world, that becomes a pretty scary scenario to think about," says Nettleton. A notable uptick in activity from like-minded groups in Somalia, Kenya, and Nigeria followed the ISIS sweep. "When you talk about Boko Haram or you talk about radical Muslims in the Philippines, they look at that and they say, 'Those guys succeeded, and that's what we're trying to do.' The natural process is then, 'How did they do it? How can we be like them? What better way than if we work together?'" It would be a logical step, based on similar goals and ideologies. Nettleton says, "Radical Muslims around the world look at what ISIS [has] done, they look at the fact that they're controlling territory, they're setting up government structures and really ruling the areas that they control." The Voice of the Martyrs comes alongside the persecuted Church in these areas. However, Nettleton acknowledges, "The challenge is even to be present in the areas that are controlled by groups like ISIS because they force the Christians to leave." He continues, "When you think about spreading the Gospel, the first question is: 'If all the Christians are gone, who's going to be there to spread the Gospel?' The other group of Christians that is affected by ISIS is Muslim converts. They don't have the opportunity to leave alive with the clothes on their back. They have the opportunity to come back to Islam or be killed."

Flag used by Islamic State in Iraq and al-Shabaab in Somalia.

And yet, the light hasn't gone out entirely. "We believe that there are some Muslim converts still in ISIS-controlled areas. I am certain that they are being very cautious, but that is really how the Gospel is going to have to be spread: by those who are boldly staying in spite of the risk." VOM is serving Iraqi Christians by providing them with daily necessities and assessing their future needs. Many of these believers fled with only the clothes on their backs. VOM is also serving those who choose to stay behind. One thing we can do is reinforce them with prayer. "Pray for encouragement, that they really will sense the Lord's presence, [that] they'll know the blessing of His presence...and His hand on them, and see Him at work through them." One other thought: Saul was one of the most zealous persecutors of the Church until God changed his heart. Then he became one of the most zealous followers of God's heart. Nettleton says, "We need to pray that God will raise up Pauls out of the Sauls of ISIS, that some of these who are now persecuting our brothers and sisters will come to faith in Christ."
Categories: Mission Network News

World Mission celebrates 20 years of ministry

Mission Network News - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 5:00am

(Photo credit Leo Reynolds via Flickr)

USA (MNN) -- Two decades of commitment is a big milestone, whether in marriage or ministry. In marriage, the occasion is celebrated with gifts of china, platinum, or emerald. World Mission is celebrating 20 years of global ministry with friends over dinner. "One of our national partners from the country of Myanmar, formerly Burma, will be joining us and sharing a testimony right from the field of how God is using The Treasure to bring Buddhists to know Jesus Christ," shares Executive Director Greg Kelley. Celebrating 20 years As World Mission celebrates their 20th anniversary, they're looking at the past with praise and to the future with hope. "This year, our 20th year in existence, we will be distributing the 100,000th Treasure, which is our solar-powered audio Bible," Kelley shares, adding the landmark Treasure will be distributed in northern Nigeria.

A man listens to The Treasure in Nigeria.
(Photo credit World Mission)

"That's really by design; it's symbolic to us because northern Nigeria has endured some of the harshest, most relentless persecution over the last three years because of the terrorist group Boko Haram." If you're close to West Michigan, you can meet World Mission staff and invest in the ministry's future at the 20-year celebration dinner on Monday, October 27. Better hurry to secure a spot, though; the RSVP deadline is tomorrow. You can RSVP by calling the World Mission office at 616-534-5689 or sending an e-mail to staff@worldmission.cc. "To distribute 100,000 [Treasures], we feel, is a great accomplishment, and we just thank the Lord for that," adds Kelley. World Mission's ministry isn't stopping at the 20-year mark, though. Looking ahead Since its founding in 1994, World Mission has been dedicated to bringing the Gospel to unreached people groups. While that mission has been accomplished in different ways over the years, the end result remains the same: introducing lost people to the hope of Jesus Christ.

The Treasure is designed to be used in a group listening setting.
(Photo credit World Mission)

Partnerships are a key component to World Mission's ministry, and one of their newest efforts involves joining hands with Bible League International. The Illinois-based group has asked World Mission to transfer their print New Testaments into audio. "Right now, World Mission is in the process of recording New Testaments so that we can get the Word of God out into areas where the Gospel's not been heard because of the number of illiterate people," Kelley explains. "They give us the printed translation, and World Mission then records it with an indigenous individual, and then we load them on the Treasures, and we distribute them." See how you can partner with World Mission here. Pray for this new partnership to bear much spiritual fruit among the world's unreached people groups. Pray also for many new supporters to come alongside World Mission in the coming year. More World Mission reports here.
Categories: Mission Network News

Iraq: taking action

Mission Network News - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 5:00am

A village in Iraq destroyed by ISIS.
(Image courtesy ANM)

Iraq (MNN) -- Do you ever feel completely helpless about what's going on in the Middle East? Well, that's why we bring you stories like this one. Advancing Native Missions says their partners in Iraq are helping people displaced by ISIS. But, with winter quickly approaching, they're in need of your help. As this recent article from the Wall Street Journal explains, families are on the move daily in Iraq. Islamic State advances have essentially divided Iraq and its displaced people into three regions: one controlled by the Kurds, one controlled by ISIS, and another held by Iraq's Shiite army. In some cases, such as the plight highlighted in the WSJ article, families are forced to cross newly-drawn borders to get daily essentials like food or medicine. At other times, as in the case of many Iraqi Christians, families are forced to flee their homes permanently. ANM recently shared an example on their blog:

(Photo credit ANM)

There was a knock, then Ammar’s wife opened the door to find a man and his son standing there. The man explained that they had escaped from Mosul and were looking for a place to stay. Ammar’s wife told him, “We are Christians.” Bursting into tears, the man responded, “I and my family love Christ.” The couple invited them in and prayed with them. Then the man left to get the rest of his family. For Ammar and his wife, strangers at the door had been revealed as family in Christ. For the family from Mosul, the Lord had provided shelter and hospitality in a time of desperate need. Christians throughout Iraq, like the couple mentioned in this story, are opening their homes to people displaced by ISIS. ANM's national partners are helping these believers put Christ's love into action by providing daily supplies for the refugees: things like shampoo, towels, diapers, first aid kits, and more.

(Photo credit ANM)

With northern Iraq's harsh winter quickly approaching, the need for more supplies is growing dire. ANM is collecting supplies for a container they hope to fill and send to their partners in Iraq by the end of October. Take action and share Christ's love with Iraqi refugees by helping ANM here. Most importantly, please continue to pray for the situation in Iraq and Syria. Pray that ISIS terrorists will somehow be contained. Pray that more supplies are gathered and sent to refugee families. More Middle East stories here.
Categories: Mission Network News

Here's to the Ones by Rhett Walker Band

New Release Tuesday - Tue, 10/14/2014 - 5:00am
Since their 2012 debut, COME TO THE RIVER, the Rhett Walker Band has toured non-stop with everyone from MercyMe to Newsboys, spending more time on the road than at home. The project generated the band's first Top 10 hit, "When Mercy Found Me," which garnered Walker a GRAMMY© nomination for CCM Song of the Year. The band also received three 2013 Dove nominations in multiple categories including New Artist of the Year, Rock/Contemporary Album of the Year and Rock/Contemporary Song of the Year. Since their inception, the group has been invited three times to perform on the Grand Ole Opry,[...]
Categories: Christian Music News

VIP by Manic Drive

New Release Tuesday - Tue, 10/14/2014 - 5:00am
VIP comes out 10/14/2014. Click here to find out how to play a part in creating this album: www.pledgemusic.com/manicdrive[...]
Categories: Christian Music News

Fightback Soundtrack by We Are Leo

New Release Tuesday - Tue, 10/14/2014 - 5:00am
[...]
Categories: Christian Music News

The Dream by Sanctus Real

New Release Tuesday - Tue, 10/14/2014 - 5:00am
Capitol Christian Music Group announces that on October 14 Sanctus Real will release THE DREAM, their seventh studio album as well as their most personal project to date. Since banding together 18 years ago, this two-time GRAMMY-nominated band is excited to return with 12 songs, including its first single, "Lay It Down," which is already a top 10 hit and continues to climb the charts at radio. The members of Sanctus Real not only enjoy collaborating as a band and communicating about life and faith through their music, but are also a band well-known for being so real not just in[...]
Categories: Christian Music News

Unto Us by Aaron Shust

New Release Tuesday - Tue, 10/14/2014 - 5:00am
[...]
Categories: Christian Music News