91.3 Lewisburg - 90.7 & 107.1 Williamsport - 90.9 Lewistown - 91.9 Kulpmont - 101.7 State College -104.7 Pottsville - 107.7 Bloomsburg 

  

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I drive one hour each way back and forth for work Monday through Friday&sometimes on the weekend. WGRC is always on the radio when I am in the car. The uplifting music and Christian programs are treasured opportunities for me to worship God and help me stay centered throughout the day. A few years ago, my son was killed in a motorcycle accident. I took a week off from work but then had to go back. It was all I could do to keep myself together during the months after his death and the hour drive each way for work was unbearable at times. I always kept WGRC on the radio and would focus on the message in the music&the scriptures that were shared which many times felt like they were directed at me at the time I needed it most. I know this was God’s way of holding me in the palms of his hands to assure me that he was with me. It was a very painful time but I felt His presence and gradually a peace that those without faith in God could never understand. (Williamsport)

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May 20, 2013

MADISON TOWNSHIP — A smoke bomb to ward off ground hogs probably set a log house ablaze Saturday, in Madison Township, Columbia County. The Press Enterprise reports, Dale Neufer said he used the smoke bomb before leaving for a luncheon at the Baptist church in White Hall about 1 p.m. When he returned to his 276 Katy’s Church Road home about 2:45 p.m., the house was in flames. Firefighters said flames were shooting up the side of the house when they arrived, and the fire definitely started on the exterior. The fire tore through the roof and basically gutted the log home. The Neufer’s will be staying with family until they find another place to live.  
(WGRC)

MOUNT PLEASANT MILLS – Two women remain at Geisinger Medical Center following a near head-on crash Friday in Snyder County. The crash happened around 4:30 p.m. on Route 35 between Mount Pleasant Mills and Richfield. State police say 24-year-old Jayla Briggs of Richfield swerved into oncoming traffic, hitting a vehicle driven by 83-year-old Lorena Reed of Mount Pleasant Mills. Both women were trapped in their vehicles and had to be cut free. They were flown to Geisinger where Briggs remains listed in serious condition and Reed remains in critical condition. Troopers say the crash remains under investigation.
Jim Diehl (WGRC)

ROCKVIEW – State Police at Rockview say two 20-year-old women were hospitalized after they were thrown from an ATV when it crashed into a tree at a home in Walker Township. The operator of the vehicle, of Howard, suffered major head trauma and was taken to Altoona Regional Hospital. The passenger, of Port Matilda, was treated for minor to moderate injuries at Mount Nittany Medical Center. Alcohol is believed to be a factor in the crash. The ATV hit the tree and slid three feet down an embankment after the operator lost control of the vehicle. Police say neither woman was wearing a helmet. Police did not release the names of the women as the crash is still under investigation.
(WGRC)

BELLEVILLE - An active duty U.S. Marine was arrested early Sunday morning at a bachelor party in Belleville, after he pointed two handguns at police and a two-hour standoff followed. Mifflin County Regional Police say Benjamin Steele, of Falls Creek, was charged with aggravated assault on police, recklessly endangering another person, and related counts after the incident, which began just before three a.m. Sunday while Steele was a guest at a bachelor party held at 70 North Kishacoquillas Street, Belleville. Police said other party guests removed a .45-caliber handgun from Steele and when he discovered that someone had taken the gun, Steele attacked and choked another guest until the weapon was returned to him. Police said Steele then threatened and pointed the handgun at the other party guests and ordered everyone out of the home. At one point Steele came out of the house with both guns and pointed them at the police and the guests and refused to put them down before returning inside the home. Police were able to talk Steele out of the home and he was taken into custody just after five a.m. The sentinel reports, he’s now jailed on $100,000 in the Mifflin County Prison.
(WGRC)

BLOOMSBURG — The town of Bloomsburg’s water company hopes to have land purchased by October so it can build a new water treatment plant designed to stay in operation through flooding. The Press Enterprise reports, if that deal is made and the company wins the approvals it needs from the state Department of Environmental Protection, the company hopes to have a new $20 million plant built within five years. Water plant operators say placing the plant outside the floodplain will help keep it in “continuous operation during future flooding.” During both the floods of 2006 and 2011, United Water had to pull equipment out of its plant on Irondale Road along the banks of Fishing Creek and stop filtering and treating water. During both of those floods, taps in town ran dry within days.
(WGRC)

PAXINOS - A PennDOT maintenance crew in Northumberland County will close a section of Irish Valley Road in Rockefeller Township for the replacement of two large cross pipes to improve drainage this week. Irish Valley Road will be closed from 7:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, May 21-22. The work will be performed between Route 890 and Poplar Road. There will be a detour in place.
(WGRC)

TURBOTVILLE - A PennDOT maintenance crew in Northumberland County will continue work to replace seven cross pipes to improve drainage along a section of Route 44 in Lewis Township. The pipes are located between Rovenolt Drive and Pine Street. Work will take place May 20-31, with daylight closures weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. A detour will be in place.
(WGRC)

SUNBURY – Weather permitting, PennDOT will be removing five large trees along route 61 outside Sunbury Tuesday and Wednesday. The removal of the trees will require a detour of Route 61 between Route 890 and Green Street from 7:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. each day. The detour will use Snydertown Road and Black Mill Road.
(WGRC)

STATE COLLEGE – Summer-long lane restrictions on northbound I-99 will start today from the Innovation Park interchange to the Route 150 interchange. Crews from Centre County Maintenance will be working on joint sealing along the corridor. Motorists need to remain alert to changing lane conditions as they travel northbound through this area. Speed limit through the work zones will be 45 miles per hour. Work will take place during daylight hours, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. but the lane restrictions will remain in place around the clock.  
(WGRC)

WILLIAMSPORT – The Lycoming College Community Orchestra, a new ensemble for local amateur musicians, is being created thanks to a $15,000 grant from the Williamsport Lycoming Community Fund at the First Community Foundation Partnership of Pennsylvania. Dr. William Ciabattari, assistant professor and chair of the music department and director of bands at Lycoming, will conduct the new orchestra. The orchestra will perform a couple of free concerts a year and target people who played in high school or college but now find themselves without an outlet to perform. The first recruitment event for the Lycoming College Community Orchestra will be an open string reading session at Lycoming’s Clarke Chapel on Tuesday, June 4 at 7 p.m. To register for this session, email ciabatta@lycoming.edu or call 321-4096; be sure to include your name, instrument and contact information.
(WGRC)

BOALSBURG - Nearly 15,000 service members make up the 28th Division of the Pennsylvania National Guard. On Sunday many of those were in Centre County to honor the sacrifice of those who served in the division. The ceremony took place at the Pennsylvania Military Museum in Boalsburg. A military band concert and vehicle displays highlighted the day. Officials say it's only fitting to have the ceremony each year at the home of Memorial Day.
(WGRC)

MIFFLINTOWN - A small crowd gathered Saturday morning to dedicate a new veteran's memorial at the entrance of Westminster Presbyterian Cemetery in Mifflintown. The sentinel reports, the invocation was given by the Reverend Albert Gray, of New Life Assembly of God in Mifflintown. The new black granite memorial wall was unveiled shortly after 11 a.m. as a crowd of about 50 people watched. One side of the monument reads, "Dedicated to all men and women from Juniata County who have served or are presently serving in the armed forces in the defense of our nation. Home of the brave - Land of the free - God bless America." On the other side, small American flags wave above 11 gold medallions representing past wars. Behind the flags, a message reminds visitors that the wall was "Presented May 18, 2013, by the Juniata County Re-enactors Association." The stone for the monument was donated by Michael Shimp and engraved by Foster Monuments. The stone facade was donated by Rickenbaugh Building Supply and masonry work was done by John Burns.
(WGRC)

MILTON – Thanks to several up and coming leaders, a Mifflinburg based charity received some monetary support to continue its mission of helping children battling cancer. High school juniors in Building Leaders for the Susquehanna Valley, a program of the Central PA Chamber of Commerce in Milton, recently raised $335 for Kelsey’s Dream. This comes despite the fact their main fundraiser, an awareness walk, had to be cancelled last minute due to inclement weather. The Building Leaders for the Susquehanna Valley District 1 students managed to collect funds prior to the planned event in April. Building Leaders for the Susquehanna Valley is one of many programs offered by the Chamber and its Central PA Business&Education Association.
(WGRC)

LEWISBURG – Nearly 920 students dawned caps and gowns at Bucknell University’s 163 commencement yesterday in Lewisburg. Twenty-nine of the students received graduate degrees. Thousands of family members and friends sat outside under gray skies as the class of 2013 crossed the stage to receive their diplomas.
(WGRC)

HARRISBURG - A federal judge will hear arguments today on the NCAA’s motion to dismiss the antitrust lawsuit Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett brought against the organization to overturn the sanctions against Penn State. The NCAA has maintained in written arguments ahead of the hearing that lawsuit does not have any merit, saying the governor does not have the standing to sue the organization and that the sanctions, including scholarship reductions and a bowl ban, do not stifle competition. Judge Yvette Kane will decide after hearing arguments from the NCAA’s lawyers and Corbett’s general counsel. The hearing will be at 2 p.m. in Courtroom No. 1 of the federal courthouse in Harrisburg. Corbett sued the NCAA in January, asking a judge to step in and stop the sanctions, which also include a $60 million fine. Penn State is not a party in the lawsuit, and university officials have said they have no intention of joining it.
(WGRC)

MILLERSVILLE - Governor Tom Corbett got a cool reception when he addressed a central Pennsylvania university's graduating class. The Associated Press says that when the governor stepped to the microphone Saturday at the Millersville University ceremony, about a dozen students turned their chairs away from the stage. About half of the faculty members wore yellow pins saying "I support public education," and a few also turned their chairs away. Some students and faculty members had objected to Corbett's appearance, citing proposed cuts in funding for state universities.
(WGRC)

HARRISBURG - A move to toughen academic achievement standards and tie them to graduation tests for public school students is facing a wall of criticism. After hours of hearings last week on the tests, top Republican lawmakers are trying to figure out what to do about the criticism. Governor Tom Corbett proposed the concept last year and it needs approval from a government regulations board. Under the proposal, students in the 2016-17 school year must pass a set of three course-specific exams in algebra, biology and English literature to graduate. Some Democratic lawmakers and school administrators question the wisdom of requiring a graduation test in poorer school districts that struggle to afford small class sizes and instructional materials. The Associated Press reports, Conservatives worry that the standards are stamping out local control of education.
(WGRC)